Puglia, Italy by Train and farming the environment

It is Bank Holiday Monday, the air is chill in Suffolk and the holiday to Puglia by train seems light years away.  A good time to create a few short posts about the trip – so how about:

  • Puglia by train and farming the environment
  • Water sports
  • Sagra
  • Old towns; Lecce and Matera
  • The Onion Cats and Casa Mare

This is the third train trip to Puglia; Wickham Market station was sunny when we left and 1,500 miles of train travel lay ahead.  All trains were on time to Paris and a lovely upgrade on the Eurostar meant a civilised lunch with wine to help the journey along.  A great new tip that helped this part of the journey was using the RER from Paris Nord to Paris Gare de Lyon and then walking to Paris Bercy.  It has become a ritual to stop at Cafe Chambertin and watch the heads emerging from the metro; but now with extra complacency from not fighting with all the steps.

All was looking good, until the lights on the boards at Bercy announced the expected arrival time for the night sleeper to Bologna.

So, a delay of one and a half hours predicted.  Still we had access to the lounge and met a couple who were on a Rotary golf tour in France, making their way to Italy and then returning to Australia in time for the elections.  Plenty to chat about.  When the train arrived not only was it late but none of the usual attendant services.  We had picked up that there may be a bit of politics going on in Southern Europe and Italy in particular about night trains.  I’m not sure if that is what happened, but things were certainly not as slick as they have been before.  Never mind, an hour and a half would still allow good time in the morning to catch the connection and of course there was a chance the train would make up time overnight.  So fully expecting to wake up with dawn somewhere near Bologna, there was no wake-up call or breakfast and it was a little surprising to wake to a light blood-orange dawn, spilling over the Northern lakes.

In the end the train was four hours late into Bologna, a whole two minutes after the Lecce connection, along with the booked seats, had departed.

Top tip here.  If you miss your train go to customer services and have your ticket stamped, at least the tickets were transferable to the next train, two hours later, but without booked seats.  ‘Stand and grow good’ I was taught as a child; six hours of standing I must be very good indeed.  The train was rammed, but the best of spirits as virtually everyone is in holiday mode.  Mostly Italians off to the south for their long break; a feisty old lady shouting about being 84 and needing a seat, which of course she was given.

Nothing can suppress for me the joy of watching the countryside change as smart northern towns give way to the polenta belt, then to grapes and unfettered blue skies.  The temperature steadily climbs, the countryside becomes browner where fields have been cleared.  Fields of sunflowers heads bowed and from Rimini on down the side of the boot there are open sea views, bodies browning, people standing and sitting in the sea – standing on a train or not, it is a great sight.  As the countryside converts to olive groves and fields of tomatoes and melons the other farming now is wind and sun.

Puglia has gone for wind and solar farming in a big way.  Not surprising as it has plenty of both and has an apparently interesting approach to planning.  The biggest problem for them is security; people keep stealing the photovoltaic panels.

We arrived late but not undaunted.  All credit to the people at e-bookers who dealt with my calls from the train to change the pick-up time for the car.  One more tip for anyone doing this journey; on the way back we found that the bus ‘A’ from Brindisi station does a loop to the airport and at 1.50 Euro is a lot better than 20 Euro for the taxi.

Greeted with wine and smiles by Debbie and Bob, all was right with the world for a relaxing two weeks at Casa Mare.

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Posted on August 30, 2010, in Green, Italy, train and tagged , , , , . Bookmark the permalink. Leave a comment.

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